Stuffed baby aubergines..

I have read and drooled over so many recipes for stuffed baby aubergines, so many of my fellow bloggers have made them and posted them, and every time I’ve wished I could reach in and eat them off the screen. I’ve wanted to try them for so long but have had a little nagging fear that they might be difficult to make…! If not difficult, then maybe fiddly?! 

Last week it was time to jump into the breach and give it a go…the only issue being, which recipe to choose???

There’s recipes from PrachiShailja, Naina, Chitra, Sonal and this one that I came across, to name a few (apologies for those I missed, I tried to remember everyone’s!) and the majority of them feature the stuffing including peanuts, coconut and spices. 

Basically, you make the stuffing part of the recipe, which creates a paste; cut into the baby aubergines, but not all the way through; then ‘stuff’ them with the paste…

  You’d think the stuffing would fall out, but it doesn’t. You’d also think that it’s fiddly work, and it is a bit, but it’s not as fiddly as I thought it was going to be.   

You can pretty much prise open the baby aubergine, spoon some of the paste, then squeeze it into the cracks..that will make more sense if you try it out! 

Once they’re all filled, you microwave the stuffed aubergines for a few minutes, then cook them. I chose to roast mine, rather than pan cook. Some of the recipes include a sauce and some don’t; this one did..

  Not so pretty once they cooked maybe, but…OMG! They taste so good!!!!!! Why did I wait so long to make them?!

And even better the next day πŸ™‚

One recipe stood out as slightly different from the rest, which was Sonal’s recipe; Sonals is a Punjabi version of stuffed baby aubergines passed down to her by her Mother. 

 In Sonal’s recipe, the stuffing is made of simply onion blended with spices to make the stuffing paste, hence the colour difference. 

I roasted these again, drizzled with a little oil..

  
It tasted equally good thing, and again was even better the next day. Where there was extra stuffing that cooked in the bottom of the pot it was good just on its own. 

I will definitely be making more stuffed baby aubergines, I plan to work through everyone’s recipes with their slight variations, and probably stuff anything else that I think might work too. 

So, the moral of the story is: get stuffing!!! It’s worth it πŸ™‚  

  (The beauty of the stalks is that you can just pick them up and snack on them like lollies!!) 

(Yes…I did!) 

PS warning..more aubergine recipes are on their way…it’s been an aubergine party in my kitchen recently! 

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60 thoughts on “Stuffed baby aubergines..

  1. polianthus

    aha – life is too short to stuff a mushroom but not too short to stuff an aubergine! I love eggplant in ever shape and form from Turkish stuffed eggplant, to baby eggplants in Thai Soup, to fish fragrant eggplant (no fish involved all vegetarian, try Fuchsia Dunlops recipe – its amazing) to steamed eggplant (Dunlop again) again a revelation AND steamed AND vegetarian πŸ™‚ – ah and this brings me to stuffed baby eggplants which I order every time I go to a lebanese restaurant and which sound different to yours – Stuffed pickled baby eggplants stuffed with walnuts – YUM – I have never made them, but if you do and I see a picture I might figure out a way to eat them off the screen .) here is a recipe :http://www.dirtykitchensecrets.com/batinjan-makdous-preserved-stuffed-aubergines/ – great to finally be on your blog again, hugs Poli

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    Reply
      1. polianthus

        Yes – I have her books too – do you have anything by Ottolenghi? I’d think you love him also if you ever get a chance to flip through books by Marcus Samuelson he has some amazing food (just close your eyes when you see the foie gras and turn the page fast)

        Liked by 1 person

      2. polianthus

        I think you will like him – he is ethiopian born, swedish adopted runs restaurants in the US and wrote a book on african cuisine which I think was part of a fund raising effort – and he comes up with very creative taste sensations that have me at least going wow, I knew the individual components but never realised they would work together like this!

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  2. Loretta

    Elaine, I’m convinced you were Indian somewhere in another lifetime. Would you look at these beauties? I’ve never tried making them, but you’re right, I too have been intrigued by the many recipes I’ve see on some Indian bloggers’ websites. What kind of aubergines have you used? I’ve seen some at the Indian stores that are long and narrow. Great post!

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    Reply
    1. Elaine @ foodbod Post author

      Ha ha! How funny! I’m pretty sure I’m not though, people often think I have some middle eastern origin too because of having lived there, but I’m not that either! Just plain old English.
      I’ve cooked the small long aubergines in the past too but for stuffing, I bought these baby round ones πŸ™‚

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      Reply
      1. Loretta

        It’s more than a compliment :). I’m impressed! I didn’t realize you were just plain old English? Was convinced you had some middle eastern blood in you. Oh well, no worries LOL!

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  3. Life Diet Health

    Delicious! We love all sorts of aubergine dishes and stuffed aubergine was the one dish hubby would eat when he didn’t like cooked veg at all! Thankfully he has now extended his range of cooked veg! These look so delicious – I think I’ll be sending someone to the local Sri-Lankan shop to stock up on baby aubergines soon!

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    Reply
      1. flynthings

        Also have been meaning to ask– what spices did you use in the Cauliflower in the picture on your blog? Looks so good πŸ™‚

        I tried looking through your Cauliflower recipes but wasn’t sure which one that picture is for.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Gretchen

    Looks so delicious. I’m hoping my baby aubergines grow well this year, then we can have at it all the time. I’m sure I have a coup,e boys who,would love these too, guess that means I would have to share.

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    Reply
  5. Pingback: Imam biyaldi..a gorgeous Middle Eastern aubergine dish.. | foodbod

  6. Pingback: GOOD LUCK

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